equal pay

  • “What is happening? This is a posting for the same job as mine and it pays $10,000 more than I make?” That is the question I posed to my supervisor more than 20 years ago as a young Black female lawyer in what was considered a high-paying job in New York City. There was no good answer given, so I applied for the job. This was the first time I discovered the issue of pay inequity for Black women, and unfortunately, I went on to discover many examples throughout my career.
  • She lives with her mother and two young children in a one-bedroom apartment, working odd and demanding hours at minimum wage, barely making ends meet. Now that her mother is ill and can no longer help her care for her children, she must leave her job and move her family into a shelter.
  • More than ten years ago, federal appellate judge Damon J. Keith cautioned that “[d]emocracies die behind closed doors.” This warning takes on renewed relevance in light of the current administration’s pervasive campaign to dismantle critical transparency measures. These measures include the collection of important data to identify and combat gender disparities in pay and lending.